A First Glimpse of the “Armadillo’s Ears”

By Peter J. Hotez

An excerpt of a blog post by Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD, published in The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) blog. Peter Hotez, MD, PhD is the founding dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and professor of the Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine (Research!America member) where he is also chief of a new Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine and the Texas Children’s Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. Hotez is the president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, director of the Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development and the Baker Institute Fellow in Disease and Poverty at Rice University.

Dr. Peter Hotez- Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine.

Dr. Peter Hotez
Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine.

The National School of Tropical Medicine, launched at Baylor College of Medicine in 2011, was established to offer a potent North American colleague to the century-old British tropical medicine schools in London and Liverpool and tropical disease institutes in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Basel, Hamburg, and elsewhere in Europe.

An essential cornerstone of the National School is translational research and development, with several core faculty members actively engaged in developing new diagnostics and vaccines for the 17 major diseases of poverty known as the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The NTDs represent a group of parasitic and related infections that actually cause poverty because of their long-term and disabling effects on childhood cognition and physical fitness and development, adult productive capacity, and the health of girls and women. They are the most common afflictions of the extremely poor in developing countries.

To jumpstart the National School’s translational R&D activities, we brought to Houston the product development partnership (PDP) of the Sabin Vaccine Institute. PDPs are non-profit organizations that use industry practices in order to make new drugs, diagnostics, vaccines, insecticides, or other products needed for the control and elimination of major global health problems, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, childhood respiratory and diarrheal diseases, and the NTDs. Sabin’s PDP emphasizes vaccines for NTDs including hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and selected viral infections such as arbovirus infections and SARS. The human hookworm vaccine is in phase 1 trials, while the schistosomiasis vaccine is expected to enter clinical testing very soon.

To read the full post, click here.

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One response

  1. Hey, I just wanted to say that I really liked the title of this post! I wanted to say thanks for taking the time to share this information, since I had not heard about the National School of Tropical Medicine before reading this post. It certainly seems like this is a worthwhile effort and I hope they are successful in their future endeavors.

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