Nobel Prize Winners Underscore the Importance of Robust Support for Basic Research

This year’s Nobel prize winners in chemistry and medicine or physiology are testimony to the importance of basic research that, while it may not demonstrate immediate benefits to human health, can lead to a greater understanding of deadly disease. Research!America applauds Eric Betzig of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Stefan W. Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany; and William E. Moerner of Stanford University, who received a graduate fellowship from the National Science Foundation, for their work in improving the resolution of optical microscopes. Their achievements have allowed scientists to study tiny cells, and in doing so, more clearly identify the emergence of diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s. These awardees join the Nobel winners in physiology or medicine – announced earlier this week – Professor John O’Keefe of the University College London, who as a postdoctoral fellow was supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health; and May-Britt and Edvard Moser, both of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Their discoveries of cells that provide the basis for how the brain maps surrounding space, allowing us to navigate difficult environments, may lead to a better understanding of diseases. If we are to continue to see progress in overcoming disease, it is vital that our elected representatives take action on behalf of the public’s interest in finding cures and increase this nation’s investment in research.

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One response

  1. […] accomplishments of the recently announced 2014 Nobel laureates in the fields of physiology or medicine, and chemistry are breath-taking. Whether identifying the mechanisms by which the mind comprehends space and […]

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