Tag Archives: American Cancer Society

World Cancer Day

Today is World Cancer Day. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for nearly one of every four deaths. Today, the American Cancer Society, the American Association for Cancer Research  and many others organizations are joining forces to raise awareness and dispel misconceptions about cancer, while encouraging policy makers to make cancer research a national priority.

What can you do?

  • Call and email your representatives.
  • Make some noise. Join the conversation on social media using hashtags #cancerresearch, #WorldCancerDay, #cancer and #curesnotcuts.
  • Take a look at the list of World Cancer Day events for more ways to get involved.

Did you know? Over the past 40 years, mortality rates for childhood cancer have been reduced significantly, dropping 66% during this time period due to early detection techniques and treatment. Learn more, here.

Federal funding for cancer research is in steady decline. Now is the time to tell your representatives that funding for cancer research is not a luxury but a MUST for improving Americans’ health. We need cures not cuts!

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

pinkribbonIt’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month! Although many great strides in new treatments and therapies for breast cancer have been made, patients and their families are still waiting desperately for a cure. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime.

This month, organizations will raise awareness and funding for breast cancer, and it’s important that we continue advocating to policy makers, media and the public about the importance of funding research at the level of scientific opportunity. Throughout October, please visit Research!America members American Cancer Society and American Association for Cancer Research to learn more about preventative care, new research and ways you can help make a difference in the fight against cancer.

Now is the time to tell Congress that we need #curesnotcuts; we need access to quality breast cancer screenings, diagnostic services and treatment, and care for all women. Speak up for breast cancer research!

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Help set our nation’s sights high on the Fourth of July

Dear Research Advocate:

Setting our nation’s sights high, rather than watching Rome burn; that’s the advice embedded in a recent op-ed authored by John R. Seffrin, PhD (CEO of the American Cancer Society and Research!America Board Member) and Michael Caligiuri, MD (CEO of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Center Hospital and Solove Research Institute). The authors advocate establishing a national plan, one that puts political differences aside and focuses on combating deadly and tremendously costly disease.

There is a compelling argument to be made that if our nation wants to sustain a balanced budget, it must deploy a disease moonshot. If our nation wants to protect the health and safety of Americans, lead medical progress instead of abandoning it, and fix the debt, health and medical research must be treated as a top national priority. Advocacy is a path that can take us there, if enough of us travel it and we raise our voices loud enough. Join us next week as we continue our national “#curesnotcuts” social media campaign during the 4th of July Congressional Recess. Check here for more information including sample messages. An article in the Portland Tribune and the ongoing regional radio interviews that I’m conducting over the recess are examples of recent media that effectively frame what’s at stake.The goal is to keep research in the news and in the hearts and minds of our nation’s decision-makers. Continue reading →

June is Men’s Health Month

Men’s Health Month increases the awareness of preventable health problems and encourages early detection and treatment of disease among males. According to MensHealthMonth.org, this is a time for health care providers, policy makers, the media, and individuals to encourage men to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury. Continue reading →

May 12-18 is National Women’s Health Week

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is marking a week-long observance of Women’s Health. In a statement about 2013’s National Women’s Health Week, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius points to the role of women as health care decision-makers in their families. Mothers, wives and daughters are often the first and primary care giver when a family member falls ill, and yet many women may overlook their own personal health. Continue reading →

May is National Cancer Research Month

Research saves lives. Fundamental research into pediatric cancers has led to a 66% decrease in mortality for these cancers over the past 40 years. Research!America is proud to recognize May as National Cancer Research Month in conjunction with our many members who are working to find and fund cures for all types of cancer. Research institutions like the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are just a handful of Research!America members who are working in this vital area of research. Continue reading →

Medical research is at risk

April is National Cancer Control Month, and there is no better time to step up and advocate for lifesaving medical research. A recent report from “PBS NewsHour” highlights the crippling effects of sequestration on funding for cancer research. The story of the Riggins laboratory is just one example of labs all over the country having to slow or stop promising research due to a lack of funding.

According to the American Cancer Society’s 2013 report, more than half a million Americans are expected to die from cancer this year alone. Continue reading →

ACS-CAN Rallies for Cancer Research Funding – With Some Help from Hoops

Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), left, and Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) both spoke at the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network rally on Capitol Hill on Thursday. Behind them is Christopher Hansen, president of ACS-CAN.

The American Cancer Society and its advocacy arm, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, kicked off its lobby day on Capitol Hill with a rally that urged Congress to preserve funding for research, prevention and treatment of cancer. But the event wasn’t just about cancer: Four Division I men’s basketball coaches also helped kick off the rally.

But it wasn’t merely a token appearance. The coaches — Tad Boyle of the University of Colorado, Paul Hewitt of George Mason University, Fran McCaffery of the University of Iowa and Mike Rice of Rutgers University — each had a personal story of how cancer had affected them or their families. The coaches are all part of Coaches vs. Cancer, an initiative of the American Cancer Society.

The coaches were joined by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) and Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO). John Seffrin, PhD, chief executive officer of ACS and ACS-CAN and a Research!America Board member, joined Christopher Hansen, president of ACS-CAN, in welcoming the crowd and introducing the speakers.

For McCaffery, the issue is intensely personal. He explained that he lost both of his parents to colon cancer, and he now participates in a study at Iowa that is researching hereditary aspects of cancer. He also told the story of a 10-year old named Jacob, who visited the Hawkeyes last season. Jacob had advanced brain cancer but was able to enjoy an evening with the Iowa basketball team in its locker room and on its bench.

Four months after the visit, Jacob passed away.

“I think about my parents,” McCaffery said. He’s active in Coaches vs. Cancer “so Jacob could have more birthdays. I promise you, my wife Margaret and I are going to continue this fight.”

Rice, the second speaker, shared a recent story about his 14-year old son and his son’s best friend, who was diagnosed with leukemia. On Labor Day weekend, while nearly all of their friends were at the beach, Rice’s son and his friend were playing video games in a hospital room. One of the boys vowed to the other that he would never again waste a sunny Saturday playing video games.

Later, Rice visited the boy’s parents and told them of Thursday’s event.

“They said, please thank them — the American Cancer Society, the volunteers, the survivors, the researchers, the doctors and the elected public officials for [putting up] this fight,” Rice said.

Boyle told the crowd that he is a newcomer to Coaches vs. Cancer, but that he and his family would be supporting the initiative in whatever way they could.

Hewitt recalled the story of Michael Isenhour, who played for Hewitt at Georgia Tech. Diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia prior to the 2001-2002 season, Isenhour underwent treatment but died the following summer.

“Then it really hit home: My dad was diagnosed with prostate cancer,” Hewitt said. “But he was fortunate enough to go to [California] and undergo a breakthrough treatment. And today he’s still teaching me how to coach.”

Harkin and Lautenberg reflected on previous legislative successes — Harkin as the architect of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Lautenberg, who crafted the legislation that banned smoking on airplanes — and vowed to continue the fight. As with the coaches, both senators had up-close encounters with cancer: Harkin lost several siblings to the disease and Lautenberg defeated lymphoma in recent years. Polis surmised that, like so many Americans, most Members of Congress or a member of their families has been affected by cancer.

“[Research] funding is absolutely critical. It’s one of the most valuable investments we as a nation can make,” Polis said. “It’s an investment in our future, an investment in lives.”

“Better therapies and a cure is attainable with the right kind of research and incentives,” Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) said during a rally on Capitol Hill for the lobby day for the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. In the background is John Seffrin, PhD, CEO of the American Cancer Society and ACS-CAN and a Research!America Board member.