Tag Archives: American Public Health Association

U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin Stepping Down in July

    left to right: Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America; Jack T. Watters, MD, Research!America Board member and VP for External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc.; and U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, at Research!America’s 2012 Advocacy Awards Dinner

left to right: Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America; Jack T. Watters, MD, Research!America Board member and VP for External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc.; and U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, at Research!America’s 2012 Advocacy Awards Dinner

Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, recently announced her resignation as the nation’s top doctor after four years in the post.

Dr. Benjamin, the 18th surgeon general, has been an active advocate for public health with a special interest in disease prevention, smoking cessation and healthy lifestyles.

“She has been a remarkable advocate in promoting the value of prevention as a national health priority. She forged the way as leader of the National Prevention Council, created under the Affordable Care Act, to help transform our nation’s health system from one that focuses on treating disease to one that focuses on prevention and staying well,” said Research!America Board member and American Public Health Association Executive Director Georges Benjamin, MD, in a press release.

Deputy Surgeon General Boris Lushniak, MD, MPH, will serve as acting Surgeon General in July while a permanent replacement is sought.

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New avian flu strain garners close attention from U.S. health agencies

The public health community is on alert over a new strain of avian flu that has made the jump from birds to people, resulting in six confirmed deaths in China.

“At this point it’s a matter of anxious waiting and good surveillance,” Research!America Board member Georges Benjamin, MD, executive director of the American Public Health Association, told Politico Pro.

Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are joining forces with other international researchers to track this new strain, H7N9. Thus far, the only infected individuals appear to have come into direct contact with sick birds, indicating that currently this new strain cannot be passed from person to person. Should the virus mutate and gain the ability to jump from one person to another, health officials will have a potentially dangerous situation on their hands. Continue reading →

National Public Health Week Twitter Chat: April 3 at 2PM

Join the American Public Health Association for a live Twitter chat at 2pm ET on Wednesday, April 3 as part of the activities for National Public Health Week. Engage with fellow public health advocates on important topics you care about. The hour-long chat will focus on the value of public health and its return on investment in our communities. Follow #NPHWchat on Twitter to participate in the discussion about ways in which evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion initiatives can save lives and money.  You can also follow National Public Health Week  and Research!America on Twitter.

It’s National Public Health Week

April 1-7 is National Public Health Week. The theme for NPHW this year highlights the return on investment we all get from public health initiatives. Resources from the American Public Health Association outline a unique focus for each day this week to show how multifaceted public health issues are impacting our lives at home, at school, in the workplace, while we travel and in our communities.

How does public health help you? Continue reading →

Funding Public Health Saves Lives and Money

For every dollar spent on prevention, more than five dollars is saved in health spending. Every $1 spent on childhood vaccines saves $16.50 in future health care costs. To learn more about how public health research benefits our lives every day, please check out the American Public Health Association’s Public Health Infographic and make sure to thank your public health professionals on the Monday of Thanksgiving, Public Health Thank You Day.

 Source: APHA