Tag Archives: brain

Member Spotlight: The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

By Peter W. Kalivas, PhD, President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr. Kalivas is Professor and Chair, Department of Neurosciences at the Medical University of South Carolina. 

blogaThe American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), founded in 1961, is the nation’s premier professional society in brain, behavior, and neuropharmacology research. The field of neuropsychopharmacology involves evaluating the effects of natural and synthetic compounds upon the brain, mind, and human behavior, and the ACNP serves as a forum for advancing the latest discoveries about the brain towards cures for neuropsychiatric diseases.

The core purpose of the ACNP is to catalyze and advance scientific discovery about disorders of the brain and behavior in order to help prevent, treat and cure brain diseases. The ACNP members are nominated from the national leadership in the fields of Biological Psychiatry and Neuroscience, and the College and its Annual Meeting are kept small by design (just over 1,000 members) in order to facilitate scientific exchange and career mentoring at the Meeting.  Importantly, the ACNP is a venue at which the best scientists from academia, government, and industry gather to share, discuss, and debate their research.  The College also plays a key role in mentoring early career clinicians and scientists in the field of neuropsychopharmacology via education, travel grants and providing individual mentors. Continue reading →

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Statement by Research!America president and CEO Mary Woolley on Omnibus Bill

We applaud portions of the omnibus bill that support the nation’s research, innovation and public health ecosystem, which works to assure our future health and economic well-being. The growth in funding for the Food and Drug Administration, fueled in part by the common-sense return of the 2013 user fees, as well as the increases for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Science Foundation are welcome news.

But funding for the National Institutes of Health has been kept well below the level of scientific opportunity. We must eliminate sequestration once and for all, and grow our investment in NIH in order to slow and halt the progression of diseases and disabilities ranging from Alzheimer’s to diabetes to traumatic brain injury. The appropriators have worked in good faith to move the nation forward.  But as long as Congress avoids the primary issues fueling our national debt – tax and entitlement reform – it will be difficult to invest robustly in solutions to our problems.

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2013 Lasker Awards Announced

The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation has announced the winners of its 2013 Awards:

Lasker_logo

  • Richard H. Scheller (Genentech) and Thomas C. Südhof (Stanford University School of Medicine) will receive the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries concerning rapid release of neurotransmitters, a process key to the way our brain cells communicate.
  •  Graeme M. Clark (emeritus at University of Melbourne, Australia), Ingeborg Hochmair (MED-El, Innsbruck, Australia) and Blake S. Wilson (Duke University) will receive the Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for the development of the modern cochlear implant — a device that allows the profoundly deaf to hear.
  •  Bill Gates and Melinda Gates will receive the Lasker~Bloomberg Public Service Award for inspiring philanthropy addressing the most pressing global health concerns. Continue reading →

Member spotlight: The Hydrocephalus Association

By Amanda Garzon, Communications and Marketing Manager and Ashly Westrick, Research Manager at the Hydrocephalus Association.

HA logoThe Hydrocephalus Association (HA) is proud to be a member of Research!America. HA is a charitable organization dedicated to eliminating the challenges of hydrocephalus by stimulating research, as well as helping people who are affected by this condition through education, support, and advocacy initiatives.  HA views research as a critical part of our mission.

Hydrocephalus is a condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within cavities of the brain. Nearly one million Americans – including children, seniors, and even veterans – are living with hydrocephalus today. There is no cure for hydrocephalus. The predominant treatment option for the disease is the implantation of a shunt through brain surgery – a device invented more than fifty years ago. The shunt has the highest failure rate of any implanted medical device, with half of all shunts failing within the first two years. A patient living with hydrocephalus is likely to undergo multiple brain surgeries in their lifetime. Continue reading →

Stadium Expansion at the University of Nebraska Includes Concussion Research Facility

The University of Nebraska isn’t the first school to integrate academic concussion research into its football program; the Matthew Gfeller Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has performed groundbreaking work for years now, and the Virginia Tech/Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences has made incredible strides in understanding if and how football helmets can protect against concussions.

Nebraska is the latest entrant; the hope is that the school’s Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior can lead to further understanding and better diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. The center — CB3 as it’s known, according to this Associated Press story — will be located within a newly expanded portion of Memorial Stadium, where the Cornhusker football team plays its home games. The video above details the CB3 and other features of the expansion. Continue reading →

Invest in America’s health

By Olivera J. Finn and Robert E. Schoen

An excerpt of an op-ed by Olivera J. Finn, PhD a distinguished professor and chair of immunology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Robert E. Schoen, MD, MPH professor of medicine and epidemiology at Pitt’s School of Medicine and Graduate School of Public Health published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Olivera J. Finn

Olivera J. Finn, PhD

Robert E. Schoen, MD, MPH

Robert E. Schoen, MD, MPH

Every day, physicians and scientists see the hope and promise that medical research brings to patients and families. For nearly 70 years, research funded by the National Institutes of Health has increased understanding of the causes of disease, contributed to longer life expectancy and improved the health and well-being of all Americans. With such a proud record of economic and social benefit, it is shocking that the House Appropriations Committee has proposed a drastic cut of nearly 20 percent to NIH funding in 2014. This outrageous proposal must be stopped.

Research is a dynamic process. New, life-improving advances are constantly within reach — but only with uninterrupted effort, commitment and funding. NIH Director Francis Collins says these cuts would be a “profound and devastating” blow at a time of unprecedented scientific opportunity. Continue reading →

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: This is your BRAIN on research

Dear Research Advocate,

On Tuesday, the president announced a new $100 million brain research initiative (BRAIN) that will involve NSF, NIH and DARPA and include support from a number of independent research institutes and private foundations. The fact that the White House has announced this “moonshot” is an important sign that research is securing its rightful role as a top national priority, which is critical to our collective goal of eliminating sequestration and aligning research funding with scientific opportunity. The president will include BRAIN in his FY14 budget, which will be released April 10.

In CQ, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) expressed support for the BRAIN initiative but commented that it should be funded by redirecting money from social and political science programs, a sentiment echoed in a statement from Speaker John Boehner’s (R-OH) office. Social and political science programs are a critical piece of our nation’s research portfolio. We are cosponsoring a Hill briefing on this topic Friday — Economics Research: Saving Lives and Money. Leader Cantor has also announced a new bill that would increase NIH funding by $200 million in order to support new research that may include pediatric diseases like autism, paying for it by redirecting public funding away from presidential campaigns.

Sequestration remains a topic generating huge interest in the media. Our community is succeeding in making sure the impact of sequestration on science is part of the conversation. USA Today ran an article describing how reduced funding and success rates for basic research is leading young researchers away from careers in academic science. The Huffington Post published a thought-provoking op-ed co-authored by Drs. Neal Lane and Peter Hotez at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine, respectively. They discuss the importance of creating a cadre of scientist-advocates or “civic-scientists” in order to engage with the public and policy makers. In The Hill, Dr. Leroy Hood, president of the Institute for Systems Biology, describes how medical breakthroughs can help solve the budget crisis through a new era of P4 medicine, which could deliver lifesaving cures and treatments to lower health care spending while powering our economy. PBS’ “NewsHour” and MSNBC’s Chris Hayes covered sequestration’s impact on science last evening and on their websites. Local media are highlighting how sequestration could impact individual institutions, such as this article illustrating the impact on front-line medical research. For those of you at institutions that have not as yet been covered by the media, now is the time to write an op-ed or reach out to your local newspaper. We can help; just ask.

The next big statement the research community will be making about the importance of research will be the Rally for Medical Research on April 8. I hope to see you there! Our board chair, former Congressman John Porter, will be among the many research champions speaking out  at the event sponsored by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). We are working to continue the momentum of the Rally so that the value of bringing together so many organizations (175 and counting) can be leveraged on a continuing basis.

Watch for our release of a new poll in conjunction with a panel discussion to be held on Capitol Hill, Conquering Pain & Fighting Addiction, on April 8 at 4 p.m. Conquering chronic pain without fear of addiction is a goal research can help address. These are topics that are underappreciated even as they are highly charged, causing great anguish as well as great suffering.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley