Tag Archives: Eric Green

Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code

Photo credit: Smithsonian

Photo credit: Smithsonian

This month “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code,” first state-of-the-art exhibition about genome science, opened at the Museum of Natural History in partnership with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The exhibit boasts cutting-edge interactives, 3D models, custom animations and engaging videos of real-life stories. According to Dr. Eric D. Green, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health (NIH), “This exhibition reflects a remarkably productive collaboration between components of two scientific icons of the U.S. government – the Smithsonian Institution and the National Institutes of Health.”

The Human Genome Project (HGP), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary, has helped researchers gain a better understanding of genes, opening pathways to new innovations for health and technology. Before the project, researchers knew the genetic basis of about 60 rare genetic diseases; when it ended the number had jumped to 2,200. Today, with research energized by the HGP, we know the genomic basis of nearly 5,000 rare disorders, according to the exhibits website. Continue reading →

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The “arms race” in the war on cancer adds new weapon to the arsenal: personal genome sequencing

Large medical centers across the U.S. are investing in a burgeoning area of healthcare for their cancer patients: “precision medicine.” Substantial investments are being made to not only build new laboratory facilities and purchase research equipment, but also to staff these new facilities. Universities like Weill Cornell Medical College, Harvard Medical School, and Johns Hopkins University are joining clinical centers like Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in building an infrastructure for personalized medicine with the hope of playing a bigger role in the development of new drugs. Continue reading →