Tag Archives: Fox News

Research!America and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Host Panel Discussion – “A World Free from Cancers: Probable, Possible, or Preposterous?”

  Leading Experts Focus on the Challenges and Opportunities Affecting the Fight Against Cancer

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – February 27, 2014 A panel of leading health, economics and policy experts today discussed the prospects for a future where cancers are rendered manageable or even eradicated and the variables affecting progress toward that goal so that cancer patients are able to lead normal, productive lives – and thus be “free from” their cancers. The forum was hosted by Research!America and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. The event, titled, “A World Free from Cancers: Probable, Possible, or Preposterous?” was held at the New York Academy of Sciences.

Medical innovation has contributed to the economic success of the U.S. over the last 50 years and it offers enormous potential to make a meaningful difference in the quality and length of our lives in the next 50 years. Of all the critical trends that will create a prosperous future, the panelists believe that medical innovation will be the most important. In order to achieve a culture of change where science and medicine will be part of the solution, all stakeholders must stand up and advocate for pro-patient and pro-innovation policies and laws. By supporting a positive regulatory and legislative environment and working toward innovative solutions for complex health care challenges, policy makers can help combat devastating diseases like cancers.

“While medical innovation has driven extraordinary progress against cancer in the U.S. and peer nations, we know that globally, cancer cases and death rates are rising. And even in the U.S., the incidence of some cancers, including pancreatic cancer, is rising,” said Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America. “We need to work together to address these alarming trends, and commit to overcoming the barriers to achieving a world free from cancers. Ensuring that U.S. policy makers sustain a policy environment conducive to rapid-pace medical innovation is crucial.”

The panel addressed the role of medical innovation, not only in the fight against cancer, but as a major force in our nation’s economic progress. Among the technological advances of the 21st century, medical innovation has been the biggest factor in improving the lives of patients, benefiting the health care system and improving prosperity. Over the past 50 years, medical innovation has been the source of more than half of all economic growth in the United States.

The panel, moderated by Fox News Channel’s Jim Pinkerton, featured several leading figures in the cancer and health care community, including:

  • Clifton Leaf, journalist and author, “The Truth in Small Doses: Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer-and How to Win It”
  • Julie Fleshman, president and CEO, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network
  • Laurie MacCaskill, seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor and chair, national Board of Directors, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network
  • Amy Abernethy, MD, PhD, director, Duke Center for Learning Health Care
  • Robert J. Hariri, MD, PhD, chairman, founder and chief scientific officer, Celgene Cellular Therapeutics
  • Scott Gottlieb, MD, resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute
  • Frank Lichtenberg, PhD, Courtney C. Brown Professor of Business, Columbia University

“Although medical innovation has played a key role in the fight against cancer and improving the overall cancer survival rate, much work lies ahead especially for deadly cancers such as pancreatic cancer where the five-year survival rate is just 6%,” said Julie Fleshman, president and CEO, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. “In order to move towards a world free from cancers, the cancer infrastructure has to continue to keep up with the advances in science and our nation needs to make medical research a priority.”

The panel discussed the benefits of past breakthroughs for some types of cancer: there have been an estimated 50 million life-years saved and $4.9 trillion added in economic value due to innovative cancer treatments since 1990. However, further success in reducing the devastating impacts of cancers and accelerating medical innovation is dependent on developing effective collaborative solutions from an “ecosystem of innovation” – bringing together scientists, patients, health care providers, private-sector medical innovators, academia, payers and policy makers – to find solutions that will save lives from all types of cancers.

“We have made great progress since 1971, when President Nixon declared the war on cancer, in terms of understanding the epidemiology of the disease, improving diagnoses, discovering new treatment paradigms and novel therapeutic approaches to better manage cancers,” said Robert Hariri, MD, PhD, chairman, founder and chief scientific officer, Celgene Cellular Therapeutics. “But the progress we’ve made is not enough. We need to continue the momentum we have started and work together to change the course of human health for patients, health care, our economy and future generations.”

About Research!America

Research!America is the nation’s largest nonprofit public education and advocacy alliance working to make research to improve health a higher national priority. Founded in 1989, Research!America is supported by member organizations representing 125 million Americans. Visit www.researchamerica.org.

About the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is the national organization creating hope in a comprehensive way through research, patient support, community outreach and advocacy for a cure. The organization is leading the way to change the survival for people diagnosed with this devastating disease through a bold initiative — The Vision of Progress: Double Survival for Pancreatic Cancer Survival by 2020. Together, we can know, fight and end pancreatic cancer by intensifying our efforts to heighten awareness, raise funds for comprehensive private research, and advocate for dedicated federal research to advance early diagnostics, better treatments and increase chances of survival. To learn more, visit www.pancan.org.

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A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Continuing Resolution Passes; Sequestration Unaffected

Dear Research Advocate,

Congress has passed a spending bill for what remains of the current fiscal year, which ends September 30. Preliminary agency funding levels have been reported by Nature. The appropriations process remains important for making up some small amount of the ground lost to sequestration, but as long as sequestration remains the law of the land, annual cuts to NIH, FDA and our nation’s other health research agencies are all but assured; and with it, the insidious ripple effect of damage to grantees, vendors, and the pharma, bio and device industries that partner with researchers to develop the products patients await. That’s the bottom line. We must remind our representatives that sequestration is not some “new normal” we will adjust to, it is a costly mistake! We must remind them that the longer it takes to correct that mistake, the more damage will be done.

As this letter is written, the Senate is debating a budget resolution for FY14. One or more amendments related to NIH are likely to be considered. While it is unlikely any of these amendments will result in increased funding next year – they are likely to be symbolic in nature – we should not dismiss them as unimportant. Singling out medical research funding for consideration and discussion during the budget debate lays the groundwork for more concrete action going forward. As does Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz’s (D-PA) introduction of a stand-alone bill, the “Inspiring Scientific Research and Innovation Act,” calling for a stunning $3 billion increase to NIH funding. Prospects for this bill are slim, but if enough advocates urge their representatives to fashion similarly bold statements of support of this nature, we can turn this around.

American priorities and American progress are on the line more than ever, yet Congress persists in acting like political parties scoring points instead of conducting the public’s business. This point and more were addressed by Research!America’s chair, The Honorable John Porter, at our Advocacy Awards dinner. Many of you have asked to see this speech, which was highlighted in Roll Call. Please contact policy makers to speak out against sequestration; better yet – contact them today and then go visit them in-district next week while they are on recess. Many of our members have or will soon engage in “Hill Day” visits with many advocates – and the timing could not be better. Our fact sheet on sequestration as well as the flyer we developed calling for cures, not cuts, are both good leave-behinds.  Developing new champions is one goal of those Hill Days, I know. Yesterday, in partnership with United for Medical Research, we held a breakfast meeting for freshman Members of Congress to meet NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins. Dr. Collins provided an overview of the opportunities for research and highlighted the challenges facing NIH, including sequestration. Please be sure to thank those who attended and use the opportunity to reinforce the local case for research.

Making the local case is equally if not more important in district as well as on Capitol Hill. This is where the media can amplify the story. Dismal news about the impact of sequestration on our nation’s world class universities is in fact being heard nationwide. Johns Hopkins University’s Dr. Carol Greider, a former Research!America Board member and Nobel laureate, was quoted in Reuters about the cutbacks her lab has faced, which have prevented her from hiring promising young researchers. An article in Fox News cites concerns from Research!America Board member Dr. Larry Shapiro, who is witnessing anxiety among young researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.  Dr. Arthur Levine of the University of Pittsburgh writes in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the staffing cuts and job losses that could occur, with some of the worst impacts hitting young investigators. The media remains hungry for stories about the impact of these cuts. Write an op-ed or pitch a story to your state or local paper. As always, let us know how we can help.

April 8 is coming right up. If you haven’t already planned to join the Rally for Research here in Washington, make it a priority. As a measure of the level of urgency of speaking out for research and against sequestration, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is, for the first time ever, shutting down their annual research conference so that all 18,000 attendees can participate. And they have extended the Rally widely, to encompass all research and stakeholders in research, to present a comprehensive perspective of health research. This is the kind of game-changing advocacy called for right now. Our Board Chair, Congressman John Porter, will be speaking at the event along with other advocates. The challenges and opportunities before us demand not just a team effort, but a HUGE team effort. Lend your talent and your time. We’ll drive across the goal line together.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley