Tag Archives: healthcare

Viewpoints of Innovative Healthcare Leaders

By Kathryn L. Kelley, Chief Advancement Officer at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Viewpoints logoMary Woolley, president and CEO of Research!America, is a guest of the popular “Viewpoints of Innovative Healthcare Leaders,” podcast beginning Wednesday, September 4.  She spoke about the lower purchasing power of NIH research dollars now compared to 20 years ago and the great need for everyone (especially researchers) to speak out about the value of research for understanding health.

The Ohio State University College of Nursing’s biweekly podcast series hosted by Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMH-NP, FNAP, FAAN, dean of the college and university chief wellness officer, spotlights top experts and helps inform listeners on best practices and emerging thoughts in the healthcare and medical fields.

When the podcast series was launched in May 2013 to positive response, Melnyk stated, “I am excited by the opportunity the College of Nursing has to share nuggets of wisdom from innovative healthcare leaders on health and wellness and how we can transform the health of Americans. This outreach to executives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals across the country will help us reach across disciplines to share insights and radical solutions for improving healthcare.” Continue reading →

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Research Australia 2013 national public opinion poll

RAustralia2Research Australia has released its 2013 public opinion poll which reveals strong support for funding health and medical research. The findings provide an interesting backdrop for the country’s parliamentary elections this year.  Research Australia asked respondents their views on what priorities the Federal Government should be focusing on over the next 2 – 3 years.  Three significant health issues ranked high in the results: improving the hospital and healthcare systems, more funding for health and medical research and increasing funding and programs for preventative healthcare. Australians value a wide range of research, from basic research resulting in new discoveries, to translational research, which turns new discoveries into treatments, devices, policies and new practices. In fact, 59% of Australians see health and medical research as part of the solution to rising health care costs compared to 83% of Americans who believe medical research is important to reducing health care costs in a December 2012 poll commissioned by Research!America. Most of the findings in the Research Australia poll are consistent with the opinions of Americans regarding the importance of health and medical research in improving the health care system, addressing health and economic challenges and sharing personal health data. Nearly 80% of Australians said they’re willing to share their personal health records for research purposes while 66% of Americans said they were willing to do so in the December Research!America poll.  But the percentage rose in a May 2013 poll – 73% of Americans said they’re willing to share personal health information to advance research assuming appropriate privacy protections are in place.  Read more of Research Australia’s public opinion poll here. Continue reading →

Millennials Move On

By Tyler Wiechman

Wiechman currently works in the cardiovascular specialty of a privately owned pharmaceutical company working with specialists and hospitals in the Central Pennsylvania Region.  He withdrew from a PhD in biomedical sciences from the Penn State University Hershey College of Medicine and received his BS in Psychology from the University of Delaware in 2011. He has worked for three different labs focusing on Neurological/Psychological health and behavior. 

TylerWAspiring medical scientists face increasing pressure as they aim to eradicate a disease state, find a new genetic marker for cancer or any number of neurological diseases, or create the next clinically sound pharmaceutical product.  First, they have to excel in their bachelor’s level biological and laboratory sciences.  This commitment alone costs tens of thousands of dollars of tuition and other bills and an overwhelming amount of time, but during these intense four years they are also expected to volunteer hundreds of hours to their local hospital and gain independent research experience.  If that’s not enough, they spend the remainder of their precious time studying for the GRE and/or MCAT depending on the degree program they plan on pursuing.  Finally (and with a huge sigh of relief), the acceptance letter is opened and you pack your bags, move to a new apartment and begin the long and arduous road that is graduate level research.

So after putting forth this much work and making so many sacrifices (and of course getting ready to multiply those sacrifices and efforts tenfold) why does a young scientist leave clinical research?  This is especially troubling when many of these pupils have personal stakes in their research due to the loss of a family or friend or a problematic condition in their genetics.  First, it’s important to look at the numbers.  The troubling truth is that, on average, there is a fifty percent attrition rate from PhD programs around the country with an even higher rate (55-59%) in the life sciences. This number is unacceptable and alarming—and I’m a member of that group.  I speak from personal experience when I say that withdrawing from my PhD was one of the hardest decisions I’ve ever had to make—thankfully my work in the pharmaceutical industry and a close relationship with my former mentors still allows me to be active in the healthcare community, but many are not as lucky and abandon their passion completely. Continue reading →

America’s Health Rankings Senior Report Released

UntitledThe United Health Foundation recently released their first-ever comprehensive report on the health of America’s senior population.  According to a statement from the authors Reed Tuckson, MD and Rhonda Randall, DO, “The report provides a comprehensive analysis of senior population health rankings on both national and state levels, and it comes at a critical time.  Americans are living longer but sicker lives, and America’s senior population is poised to grow 53 percent between 2015 and 2030.”  This fascinating report ranks each state by the incidence of several factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, low-care nursing, and food insecurity.

The United Health Foundation, a Research!America member, is dedicated to creating a healthier America and, through this report , the authors have released some disturbing data.  For example, over a quarter of seniors are obese which places them at far greater risk of debilitating diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and certain cancers.  Obesity, which was recently declared a disease by the American Medical Association, is also commonly linked to poorer health status and premature death.  It is imperative that we work to reverse these trends as our population continues to age and place a greater burden on the healthcare system.  Click through the report and see how your state ranks in the health of its seniors. Continue reading →

Statement from Research!America president and CEO Mary Woolley about AHRQ Director Carolyn Clancy’s Departure

January 31, 2013

Dr. Carolyn Clancy has been a stalwart champion of medical and health services research during her decade-long leadership at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), stressing the importance of evidence in formulating policies to address gaps in care and improve health care delivery.  She spearheaded innovative evidence-based programs to tackle some of our most challenging and complex healthcare issues. Under her leadership, AHRQ has conducted and funded research to ensure that patient care is as safe and efficient as possible, and launched the first annual report to Congress on health care disparities and health care quality.  Clancy recognizes the importance of empowering patients with information to understand their health care needs and make informed decisions, and empowering health care leaders with the evidence needed to bring the right care to the right patient at the right time.  She generously lent her time and expertise as a speaker at Research!America’s National Health Research Forums, joining leaders of other federal health agencies for panel discussions, and contributed to other initiatives. Hers is an important and lasting legacy.

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