Tag Archives: Hudson Institute

Report on Social and Economic Impact of NTDs

In November 2012, the Hudson Institute and the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases released a Social and Economic Impact Review on Neglected Tropical Diseases. The report, which was the culmination of a comprehensive research and policy analysis study, outlined the economic and social impact of seven of the most common NTDs including lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, trachoma, schistosomiasis, hookworm, ascariasis and trichuriasis. These diseases impose a huge economic burden by causing roughly 46-57 million years of healthy life lost due to premature death or years lived with a disability. The report also quantified the economic burden in terms of lost productivity caused by NTDs and highlighted the success of current treatment efforts. For example, trachoma, the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness, causes up to $5.3 billion in lost economic productivity each year while treatment efforts for lymphatic filariasis have saved over $24 billion in lost economic productivity.

The report argues that one of the most promising ways to treat many of these NTDs is mass drug administration (MDA), which involves treating entire populations with drugs for the seven most common NTDs. These MDA programs are also successful examples of critical public private partnerships. The combination of federal government investments in basic R&D and private sector investment in later stage R&D has produced crucial drugs that private sector companies are now donating in order to support mass drug administration programs.  These public private sector collaborations, combined with investments in research and development for new tools to control NTDs, remain one of the core recommendations from the report. Research!America will continue to advocate for federal government support for R&D for NTDs and will be working with the private sector to limit the economic devastation and healthy life years lost to these diseases.

-Chris Bennet, Senior Manager of Global Health R&D Advocacy

Advertisements

Briefing on the Social and Economic Impact of NTDs

On January 17, the Hudson Institute and the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases held a briefing event to discuss their recently released report, Social and Economic Impact Review on Neglected Tropical Diseases. In addition to negative health outcomes, the report highlights the social and economic costs of these deadly diseases and argues that NTD control and elimination programs are a cost effective public health measure. For example, Michael Kremer, Gates professor of Developing Societies at Harvard University, discussed de-worming as an extremely cost effective development intervention. Several studies around the world, including in the southern United States, have shown that de-worming is worth our money and attention as it can lead to increased labor outputs, higher wages and better test scores among students.

Panelists at the event also paid tribute to many organizations that have altered the landscape of NTDs: the Rockefeller Foundation, whose campaign against hookworm has had a long standing effect in the American South and pharmaceutical company Merck & Co., who made an unprecedented commitment in 1987 to donate the drug Mectizan for as long as necessary for the control of onchocerciasis (river blindness). Other pharmaceutical companies have followed suit and drug donation programs are now being administered around the world. Of course, these programs would not be possible without collaborative partnerships between a host of public and private sector entities, from multilateral and government agencies to local on-the-ground operations. In addition to transforming the NTD landscape, lessons learned from these public private partnerships and other NTD control efforts have helped to inform other global health programs around the world.

Finally, Ellen Nagler, CEO of the END Fund, discussed the Fund’s private philanthropy model that allows the private sector to invest in NTD interventions for maximum impact. The END Fund provides capital resources and capacity to collaborate with governments and existing organizations to scale up treatments for individuals most at risk. Fifty cents per person to treat the seven diseases affecting 90% of the world’s poorest is a powerful return on investment. Nagler concluded that in order to raise the money necessary to reach our goals and eliminate these diseases, a lot more people will need to be educated about NTDs and their impact throughout the world. Please read Research!America’s summary of the report  in tomorrow’s post.

-Jennifer Chow, Director of Global Health R&D Advocacy