Tag Archives: Jack Kingston

Informative Conversations Highlight Ask Your Candidates! Event in Atlanta

Election season is all about voters getting to know the candidates running for public office in their state.  Through town hall and other meetings, articles and editorials, advertisements and debates, voters obtain information about each candidate that can inform their decision-making at the polls. Ask Your Candidates! (AYC!), a voter education initiative launched by Research!America and terrific partners representing just about every segment of the medical and health research ecosystem, helps connect voters and candidates on the issue of America’s faltering commitment to medical progress. And AYC! did just that last Friday during its first event, a non-partisan meet-and-greet in Atlanta where candidates for U.S. Senate from Georgia discussed the role Congress plays in fueling U.S. medical innovation. The event, called “American Medical Progress: A Conversation with Candidates,” focused on the roles of the private sector and government in the research pipeline that discovers and develops lifesaving medical innovations. All of the candidates were invited, and remarks were delivered by three candidates – Art Gardner (R), Derrick Grayson (R) and Steen Miles (D) – and campaign representatives for Phil Gingrey (R), Jack Kingston (R), Michelle Nunn (D) and Branko Radulovacki (D). David Perdue (R) provided a statement that was read at the event. Click here for a transcript of the candidates’ remarks.

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A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: First 100 Days

Dear Research Advocate,

With all the conversation about the debt ceiling and tax and entitlement reform, it may surprise you to know that an additional topic is on many minds. A wide majority of Americans, 72%, say the new Congress and the president should take action to expand medical research within the first 100 days of the new legislative session. See this and more in America Speaks, Volume 13, a compilation of national poll data providing insights into public sentiment on key research-related issues. See our press release and download the full Poll Data Summary. These polling results are designed to be used in your advocacy and outreach!

Among the growing number of issues that need to be resolved by the new Congress is the medical device tax, which could send research jobs overseas and shrink a critical segment of our innovation economy. In The Hill, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH) writes about the consequences the tax could have on the medical device industry, including the possibility of a massive decline in R&D investment. As our economy recovers, policy makers must better incentivize R&D investment to keep our nation competitive and ensure that companies are continuing to invest in life-saving research.

More on the first 100 days: As you know, the sequestration deadline has been moved two months, with another delay possible, and there is talk of other cuts to discretionary spending. The delay is terribly frustrating for those planning research investment and sends a very negative message to young scientists planning a career, but it does buy us more time to make our case. The Washington Post published an op-ed by three Washington, DC, institutional members of Research!America that argues compellingly for such funding. Take action now and do two things — collaborate with your local colleagues to write an op-ed for a local publication and send an email to your representatives. Tailor the alert we provide to let them know how cuts could affect your institution and your community.

For those of you in Georgia, the appointment of Rep. Jack Kingston (R-GA) as chairman of the committee that allocates most of the federal funding for biomedical and health research funding presents an important advocacy opportunity. Research!America is helping to facilitate collective action by Georgia institutions, and we would welcome your participation. Please contact Max Bronstein, director of science policy, if you haven’t heard from us yet! Recently, I had the opportunity to discuss Rep. Kingston’s record and prospects for the 113th Congress with Randy Barrett of the ScienceInsider.

Great news! The U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision on behalf of patients and stem cell researchers, effectively bringing to a close the infamous Sherley v. Sebelius case that threatened federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. This decision marks a major victory for the stem cell research cause, but it is critical that all of us remain vigilant; actions at the state level could still curtail embryonic stem cell research. View our press statement on the decision and our updated resource page on stem cell research. We will be talking about the importance of stem cell research when we honor the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) at our upcoming Advocacy Awards dinner. See more about this March 13, 2013, event here.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Going Viral as we Face the Next Cliff

Dear Research Advocate,

The two-month reprieve from sequestration agreed to as part of the “deal” to avert the fiscal cliff is a partial victory for all who worked hard to save research, giving us much-needed additional time to make our case.  We need be smart in using that time well,  because the delay was paid for through a combination of new revenue and spending cuts that could further drain the pool of dollars used to fund research. The fact that many conservative members of Congress expressed outrage that the fiscal cliff deal didn’t include larger spending cuts underscores this point. The debt ceiling will need to be raised within the next two months, adding fuel to the fire. And efforts to pass a budget for fiscal year 2013 rather than rely on a full-year continuing resolution throws another variable into the mix.

The bottom line is that the scenario for the next few months leaves science quite vulnerable, as reported in Scientific American, in which Research!America VP Ellie Dehoney is quoted. The palpable uptick in articles and opinion pieces raising awareness about the ongoing threat to research from a wide variety of stakeholders, including the Huffington Post piece by Research!America Board member Dr. Victor Dzau, president and CEO of the Duke University Health System, must continue; in fact we have to go into overdrive. In my last letter, I shared a CBS Evening News segment we worked to arrange about the impact of sequestration – I’m told it has gone viral! Please keep the momentum going by sharing it with your networks.

As you may know, Rep. Jack Kingston (R-GA) has been named chairman of the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee, which sets funding for NIH, CDC and AHRQ. Rep. Kingston previously chaired the subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, and the Food and Drug Administration. He was supportive of increases for FDA despite the budget-cutting pressure that faced the 112th Congress. Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL) has been named chairman of the agriculture subcommittee. Rep. Aderholt has demonstrated an interest in combating disease and disability. We look forward to working with these leaders and their Democratic counterparts to secure the resources that research-related agencies need to fulfill their multi-faceted missions.

In the wake of the tragedy in Newtown, the White House is looking for feedback on anti-violence strategies from organizations in the mental health community. The email address is policyideas@ovp.eop.gov. Note that the deadline is January 5. The Cure Alliance for Mental Illness has launched a petition calling on Congress and the president to increase funding for mental illness research. Our community will have an important role to play in ensuring that time does not dilute the urgency behind efforts to reduce violent acts like that in Newtown. Research is undoubtedly part of the answer.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley