Tag Archives: John Edward Porter

Are we doing enough to accelerate medical progress?

Excerpt of an op-ed by Research!America Chair The Hon. John E. Porter and Research!America Board member The Hon. Kweisi Mfume published in The Hill.

John Edward Porter

The Hon. John E. Porter

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The Hon. Kweisi Mfume

The value of innovation has captured the attention of policymakers as they debate the merits of federally funded medical and health research. There is clearly bi-partisan support for research but battle lines have been deeply drawn over funding for research agencies in this tight fiscal climate.

The National Institutes of Health – the world’s leading funder of game-changing basic medical research –  and other agencies contributing to the research pipeline are still affected by sequestration, the ongoing automatic spending cuts that have gutted promising research and shuttered labs. Congressional support for legislation to fund children’s health research demonstrates interest in accelerating medical progress, but the amount is miniscule compared to what’s needed to fuel our engine of discovery. The NIH has lost about 25 percent of its purchasing power in the last decade, jeopardizing the development of lifesaving therapies unleashed by genomics and other scientific breakthroughs. As a result, young scientists unable to secure grants for innovative research are leaving their careers, and institutions are struggling to continue important NIH-funded studies that could help combat national and global health threats.

To address the recent spread of polio in the Middle East and Africa, and the growing epidemic of noncommunicable diseases, we need more training and research to effectively put scientific discovery into practice. Sufficient resources will enable the NIH to train more scientists to better address global health issues which also affect us closer to home – heart disease, cancer, mental illness, diabetes and HIV/AIDS. Outbreaks of polio have impacted a nearly three-decade effort to eradicate the disease globally. The World Health Organization has declared the disease an international public health emergency as it re-emerges in Pakistan, Cameroon, Syria and other countries previously free of polio which can kill or cripple the hardest-hit victims.

Why isn’t Congress paying closer attention to the health threats before us?  To accelerate innovation, protect health and save lives, policymakers must close the massive gap between the level of funding necessary to advance medical progress and the token funding levels allocated to research over the last several years.

Read the full op-ed here.
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A Weekly Advocacy Message from Research!America: Rallying more defenders of science

Dear Research Advocate:

In recognition of his many accomplishments as a champion for research, Research!America Chair and former Congressman John Edward Porter was honored by the National Academy of Sciences with the Public Welfare Medal, the Academy’s most prestigious award. This well-deserved acknowledgment of Porter’s tireless efforts to advance innovation and engage scientists in advocacy should motivate advocates to follow his lead and speak up about threats to our nation’s research ecosystem. Read our statement on the award ceremony here.

In his remarks, Mr. Porter noted that “political judgment should never be allowed to be substituted for scientific judgment.” This point was particularly well-timed as political attacks on science, particularly health services research, continue unabated.

A case study from Louisiana highlights the importance of health research in saving lives. Children’s Hospital in New Orleans had an outbreak of a deadly hospital-acquired infection, mucormycosis in 2008-09. In response to several outbreaks in recent years, the CDC launched new targeted initiatives to help hospitals and health departments share information with the public about hospital-acquired infections.This type of public health work, based on health services research findings, is critical to delivering high quality care, reducing medical errors and protecting patients. Continue reading →

Statement by Research!America Chief Operating Officer Michael Coburn on Public Welfare Medal Recipient John E. Porter

Research!America salutes Board of Directors Chair John Edward Porter, the 2014 recipient of the Public Welfare Medal from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Academy’s most prestigious award to honor the extraordinary use of science for the public good. Porter’s leadership in advocacy for research has strengthened our nation’s global competitiveness in science and technology and advanced medical innovation to new heights.  As chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, Porter demonstrated tremendous foresight, calling on policymakers to support robust investments in research to improve quality of life, combat debilitating and deadly diseases and stimulate private section innovation. With the doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget (FY99 – FY03), Porter helped usher in a new era of improved health and longevity for all Americans. A lifelong public servant, Porter continues to champion biomedical research in the U.S., urging researchers, patients and the public at large to become stronger advocates for science.  As an inspirational force in the scientific community, Porter joins a distinguished group of medal recipients who leave a strong legacy for future generations.

 

Statement by Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley on John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center Building Dedication

Research!America members and partners extend warm congratulations to Research!America Chair The Honorable John Edward Porter for his well-deserved recognition by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with the dedication of the Porter Neuroscience Research Center. Our nation has benefited from Mr. Porter’s leadership in advancing medical and health research as chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education during his tenure in Congress, and as an indomitable force in the research advocacy community. As a U.S. representative, he worked across the aisle to cultivate champions for research, articulating the societal and economic benefits of medical innovation. Porter also spearheaded efforts to double the NIH budget, the largest funding increase in the agency’s history. As Research!America’s chair, he has propelled the organization’s mission forward by igniting a passion for medical research advocacy among scientists, patient advocates, industry partners and the academic community. His deep commitment to convincing policy makers that medical research must be funded at the level of scientific opportunity is unmatched, earning the respect of congressional colleagues and leaders in all sectors. For his dedication to making research for health a much higher national priority, we salute him.

 

Research!America’s Inaugural Advocacy Academy

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Advocacy Academy participants: Mesias Pedroza, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine; Chloe N. Poston, PhD, Eli Lilly and Company; Jeffery G. Mellott, PhD Northeast Ohio Medical University

Last week, we held our inaugural Advocacy Academy, bringing 12 postdoctoral researchers from across the U.S. to Washington, D.C.  A two-day advocacy training program that culminated in Congressional visits with the participants’ representatives. We selected this group of motivated and concerned early-career scientists from a diversity of institutions, including Northeast Ohio Medical University, UCSF, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Weill Cornell Medical College, the University of Washington and Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Eli Lilly and Company,  as well as local researchers at the National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. For these young researchers, sequestration and budget cuts have clamped down on available resources to investigate diseases in the lab and raised concerns about the viability of a future career in research. Feeling compelled to take action, these postdoctoral research fellows came to Washington to convey the personal and societal importance of medical and health research.  And they did a terrific job. Continue reading →

A do-nothing Congress isn’t healthy

Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 – 2001) published in CNN.

John Edward PorterAt every congressional recess, the question remains: What has Congress accomplished to advance medical innovation, or for that matter any of our national priorities?

A ritual of leaving town with no meaningful action on pressing issues seems to have taken hold as lawmakers once again meet with voters in their districts. Indeed, much will happen during this break, but as elected officials hold yet another town hall meeting, Facebook or Twitter chat or public event, thousands will be diagnosed with cancer or get the dreaded confirmation from a physician that they or a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease. Thousands will suffer a heart attack or stroke, and thousands of parents will learn that their child has a rare disease.

Researchers are racing against the clock to identify a new gene or molecule that could lead to the next medical breakthrough and bring us closer to cures and new therapies to halt disease.

Time is of the essence in the scientific community, but unfortunately, our elected leaders continue to squander precious time in political, ideological battles that yield little or no results. Is this the Congress you elected? This is not the first elected body to tackle formidable challenges, but it may be the first that has failed miserably in addressing critical issues that will have short- and long-term implications for the health and well-being of Americans.

Spending bills to fund the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and other agencies in the next fiscal year remain in limbo as sequestration, across-the-board spending cuts enacted in March, tightens its grip on medical innovation. As a result of these mindless budget cuts, researchers are delaying or scrubbing promising studies. Institutions across the country have closed labs, reduced their work forces and implemented hiring freezes. Young scientists are rethinking their career paths or moving abroad to countries that have accelerated investments in research. Continue reading →

One week away: the Rally for Medical Research

Rally For Medical ResearchNext Monday, April 8, is the Rally for Medical Research! Speakers at the rally will include Research!America Chair the Honorable John Edward Porter, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Ranking Member on the Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Ranking Member on the House Budget Committee as well as actress and breast cancer survivor Maura Tierney (best known for her roles on NewsRadio & ER) and many others!

If the medical research community advocates hard enough and loud enough, we may be able to turn the tide on cuts to research funding. As recently reported in the Washington Post, sequestration cuts can be countered if we urge policy makers to make research a higher national priority. Now, more than ever, we must make it clear to our legislators that federal research funding is critical to the health and well-being of Americans.

If you can’t make it to the rally, you can watch the event live on the web, contact your representatives in Congress and write a letter to the editor for your local paper to support medical research. Resources to help you write and call your Senators and Congressmen or to write a letter to the editor are available in the Rally’s toolkit.

A special thanks to Maura Tierney, Rep. Chris Van Hollen and Rep. Rosa DeLauro for their support of the Rally and medical research!

Research!America Honors Senators Richard Burr and Bob Casey for Strengthening our Nation’s Commitment to Research and Development

Burr and Casey to Receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy at Research!America’s Advocacy Awards Dinner on March 13

Alexandria, Va.February 6, 2013–Sens. Richard Burr (R-NC) and Bob Casey (D-PA) will receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy for their leadership and strong support of federal and private sector medical research and innovation. Sens. Burr and Casey have worked individually and in a bipartisan manner to promote a robust medical research pipeline in the U.S. and ensure patients receive access to new, safe and effective treatments and technologies on a timely basis.

“Senators Burr and Casey exemplify what it means to be a research champion,” said Research!America Chair John Edward Porter. “They have each devoted their energies to ensuring that federal funding and policies are aligned with the goal of accelerating medical progress, from basic research to private sector discovery to timely patient access.  Congressional support for the public and private sector research pipeline is critical to capitalize on recent breakthroughs, maintain our global competitiveness as other nations dramatically ramp up their investments in medical innovation, and fight back against costly, devastating illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease and cancer.”

During their combined 14 years of experience as members of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, Sens. Burr and Casey have championed legislation to catalyze and improve the research pipeline, and they jointly sponsored a bipartisan letter in support of research conducted by the National Institutes of Health.

Sen. Burr introduced and achieved passage of legislation to establish the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), which uses pioneering research to develop new technologies aimed at diagnosing, preventing and treating, among other conditions, breast cancer and spinal cord injuries. He also introduced the Promoting Accountability, Transparency, Innovation, Efficiency and Timeliness at FDA (Patient’s FDA) Act with Sen. Tom Coburn, MD (R-OK) to ensure timely patient access to new drugs and medical devices. Sen. Burr’s Biodefense and Pandemic Vaccine and Drug Development Act of 2005 allows rapid development of certain drugs and vaccines in case of a pandemic or natural disease outbreak.

“I am honored to receive this award, but the people who really deserve it are the hard-working, dedicated and brilliant researchers and scientists in North Carolina and across the country who are making breakthroughs every day that enhance the quality of life and, in many cases, save lives,” said Sen. Burr. “They are the ones we should all be honoring.”

Sen. Casey led a bipartisan group of lawmakers in introducing the Life Sciences Jobs and Investment Act of 2011, legislation that would double the R&D tax credit for life science firms. He also introduced the Creating Hope Act of 2011, a bill to foster the development of research breakthroughs for rare and neglected diseases, such as pediatric cancers and malaria. Last year, he sent a letter to Senate appropriators to inform them of a breakthrough in genetics research and emphasize the importance of maintaining NIH funding.

“I am honored to receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy from Research!America,” said Sen. Casey. ”Pennsylvania is a leader in the area of medical research which is critical to preventing, treating and curing diseases. Medical research is also a field that employs thousands across the state and plays an important role in the Commonwealth’s economy. I believe that it is essential to continue support for medical research because of the potential health benefits for all Americans and the importance of ensuring that our nation remains at the forefront of medical innovation.”

The Whitehead Award will be presented to Sen. Burr and Sen. Casey at Research!America’s 2013 Advocacy Awards dinner on Wednesday, March 13, in Washington, DC. The program honors outstanding individuals and organizations in advocacy for medical, health and scientific research. The Whitehead Award, named in honor of Research!America’s founder, Edwin “Jack” Whitehead, recognizes exemplary leaders, particularly those in public office, who have demonstrated a deep commitment to advancing biomedical and health research as a national priority and who galvanize others in support of science.

Other Advocacy Award winners include Diane Rehm, author and host of WAMU 88.5 and NPR’s “The Diane Rehm Show”; John F. Crowley, patient advocate and inspirational entrepreneur, chairman and CEO of Amicus Therapeutics, Inc.; John Mendelsohn, MD, director, Khalifa Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy and former president at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Mark Rosenberg, MD, president and CEO, The Task Force for Global Health; and the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

About Research!America’s Advocacy Awards Dinner

The annual Research!America Advocacy Awards program was established in 1996 by the Board of Directors to honor outstanding advocates for medical, health and scientific research. Recognized individuals and organizations are those whose leadership efforts have been notably effective in advancing our nation’s commitment to research. This year the awards event will take place on March 13, 2013, at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.researchamerica.org/advocacy_awards.

About Research America

Research!America is the nation’s largest nonprofit public education and advocacy alliance working to make research to improve health a higher national priority. Founded in 1989, Research!America is supported by member organizations representing 125 million Americans. Visit www.researchamerica.org.

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