Tag Archives: Policy Cures

Report Highlights Need for More R&D Funding for Neglected Diseases

On December 3, Policy Cures released its fifth annual G-FINDER report, a comprehensive survey of funding for research and development for neglected diseases. The report tracks global public, private and philanthropic investments into R&D for 31 diseases, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and NTDs.  In positive news, this year’s report shows that total funding has actually increased by $443 million since 2007.

The report demonstrates that government funding, which accounts for over two-thirds of all investment, is increasingly going toward basic academic research, rather than product development. Research!America believes it is vital that the entire research pipeline be fully funded. Basic research will help us understand the best ways to tackle these neglected diseases and give us a better understanding of disease and the human body.  However, we also need robust funding for the development of urgently needed tools like drugs, vaccines and diagnostics. This urgency is worsened by the fact that private and philanthropic investments in product development for NTDs have also decreased.

Because NTDs disproportionately affect the “bottom billion” or individuals earning less than $1.25 per day, there is essentially no market demand for new NTD tools, so the private sector is unlikely to fund these projects. Dr. Moran, director of Policy Cures, believes that governments must step up to the plate, saying that “if [governments] want products for neglected diseases, they must fund product development as well as basic research.”

-Morgan McCloskey, global health intern

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Bloomberg View: Global Health Problems are U.S. Problems, Too

A recent unsigned editorial by Bloomberg View restates what we’ve been saying for some time: Americans are not immune from global health problems.

The editorial focuses on West Nile virus and dengue, though there are certainly other diseases and conditions that were worthy of inclusion.

Worldwide travel means diseases are more transmissible than ever, and climate change gives disease-carrying mosquitoes more hospitable climates, the editorial notes. And a lack of treatments exacerbates the problem.

“Patients receive acetaminophen for fever and pain, fluids if they are dehydrated, and get-well wishes,” the editorial states. “No vaccines, no cures and no specific medicines exist to prevent or treat dengue or West Nile.”

The editorial lauds the National Institutes of Health for its focus on disease research that remains unattractive to industry and product development partnerships that have allowed new therapies to come to market.

“Although the U.S. is the largest funder of neglected-disease research, its spending declined 5.1 percent in 2010, according to an annual survey conducted by the research group Policy Cures,” the editorial concludes. “As the U.S. outbreaks of West Nile and dengue show, this spending is now a vital investment in the health of American citizens.”