Tag Archives: Research Australia

Research Australia 2013 national public opinion poll

RAustralia2Research Australia has released its 2013 public opinion poll which reveals strong support for funding health and medical research. The findings provide an interesting backdrop for the country’s parliamentary elections this year.  Research Australia asked respondents their views on what priorities the Federal Government should be focusing on over the next 2 – 3 years.  Three significant health issues ranked high in the results: improving the hospital and healthcare systems, more funding for health and medical research and increasing funding and programs for preventative healthcare. Australians value a wide range of research, from basic research resulting in new discoveries, to translational research, which turns new discoveries into treatments, devices, policies and new practices. In fact, 59% of Australians see health and medical research as part of the solution to rising health care costs compared to 83% of Americans who believe medical research is important to reducing health care costs in a December 2012 poll commissioned by Research!America. Most of the findings in the Research Australia poll are consistent with the opinions of Americans regarding the importance of health and medical research in improving the health care system, addressing health and economic challenges and sharing personal health data. Nearly 80% of Australians said they’re willing to share their personal health records for research purposes while 66% of Americans said they were willing to do so in the December Research!America poll.  But the percentage rose in a May 2013 poll – 73% of Americans said they’re willing to share personal health information to advance research assuming appropriate privacy protections are in place.  Read more of Research Australia’s public opinion poll here. Continue reading →

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Canada’s Research Funding Also Facing Cut Backs

Alan I. Leshner, PhD

Alan I. Leshner, PhD

In a recent op-ed published in the Toronto Star Dr. Alan Leshner, Research!America board member, writes that federal deficits in the United States and Canada “pose a significant threat” to basic research.

He notes that “some policy-makers seem to value near-term, industry-focused science more highly.” But adds that basic science has larger potential payoffs than applied research. “The most well-known example of life-changing basic research is of course Sir Alexander Fleming’s accidental 1928 discovery of a mould (penicillin) that seemed to repel bacteria. German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen’s 19th century efforts to pass cathode rays through glass now allows doctors to see inside the human body without surgery, using X-rays. More recently, a $250,000 study on “the sex life of the screwworm” — a title that prompted the late U.S. senator William Proxmire to mock efforts to better understand a lethal livestock pest — has so far saved the U.S. cattle industry more than $20 billion.” Continue reading →

Research!America, Research Australia, Research Canada and Research!Sweden sign letter of agreement

Research!America and its international partners, Research Australia, Research Canada and Research!Sweden, have signed a letter of agreement, capitalizing on a long-standing partnership among these research advocacy organizations. Over the past decade, Research!America, Research Australia and Research Canada have met informally on several occasions and presented and attended each organization’s annual meetings and conferences. Recently, Research!Sweden joined this alliance, bringing its unique programs, approaches and strategies to this international group.

The agreement is intended to foster greater collaboration among the four organizations in an effort to leverage expertise, advancements and approaches in health research advocacy, as well as facilitate the sharing of best practices in biomedical and health research advocacy, governance and operational policies and procedures. The agreement will promote enhanced communications among the four organizations and open the door to explore opportunities to collaborate internationally on health research advocacy ventures. The two-year agreement reflects the efforts of all four organizations to make biomedical and health research higher priorities in their respective countries. You can read the full letter of agreement here on Research!America’s website.

You can also visit the websites for these international research advocacy organizations: Research Canada, Research Australia and Research!Sweden.