Tag Archives: Rosa DeLauro

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Time to be honest with ourselves

Dear Research Advocate:

This week’s CDC announcement of the worst-case Ebola scenario is staggering. Saying, “Let’s be honest with ourselves …” President Obama addressed the UN this morning on the escalating threat posed by Ebola, urging world leaders to work together to address this truly global crisis. The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) program, which received additional funding for Ebola drug development as part of the recently passed continuing resolution (CR), is a terrific example of how the public and private sectors can work together to develop drugs for national and global health threats like Ebola. BARDA provides market incentives so that private sector innovators can work on noncommercial emergencies. It’s a cost-effective strategy since it precludes the need for government to build drug development capacity the private sector already has, and it’s a good reminder that medical and health research is not about government funding, academic research, or private sector R&D. It’s about all of these things and all of us, working together to save lives.

Let’s be honest with ourselves about something else: policies that cripple private sector investment in research are stifling science.  One such policy involves the research and development (R&D) tax credit, which – despite historical bipartisan support – expired at the end of 2013 and has not been reinstated. Businesses of all sizes across a wide swath of scientific sectors rely on predictable, annual extensions of this tax credit (not that annual extensions are ideal; Congress would also be wise to finally make this credit permanent). Please consider sending a message to your representatives about the importance of reinstating and enhancing the R&D tax credit. Here are two good resources, one nationwide quantitative analysis from the National Association of Manufacturers and one qualitative account of the effects on businesses in Pennsylvania. Members of Congress must work together and quickly upon their return to Washington after the election to not only reinstate the R&D tax credit, but to enhance its reach and effectiveness. And they must pass an appropriations package that recommits to scientific innovation. Note I use the word “must,” not “should.”  When one assumes the role of leader, displaying leadership should not be an option.

And let’s be honest that we are under-investing in our federal research agencies. Determined to alter this state of affairs, Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY-26), along with Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT-03), recently introduced the Accelerating Biomedical Research Act in the House. The congressman is using some of his district work period/campaigning season to tour institutions that receive NIH funding in his district. If only more incumbents and challengers followed his example!  Rather than despairing that there aren’t more like Mr. Higgins, now is the time to work toward the day that there will be! Candidates who hear voters like you speak passionately now about the importance of advancing medical progress are more likely to become champions for research when they enter Congress next January. Personal stories about why research matters in your life and in your community make for some of the most persuasive advocacy tools.

Let’s be honest that along with personal stories, data truly is important (my advice: tell your story first, after that, add data). Consider the new easy-to-use district-level federal research funding fact sheets from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). These local, by-the-numbers summaries provide information about the number of grants received in nearly 400 congressional districts from the NIH, NSF, DOE Office of Science, and Agriculture and Food Research Initiative in the Department of Agriculture and are useful additions when making your case for research.  We urge you to share this data as well as your commitment to voter education with five of your friends and family!  Join us in the “5 this Fall” campaign on social media.

Final note of honesty about social media … it works! Think “Ice Bucket Challenge” and think about the new ACT for NIH campaign, which is using “selfies” as a way to remind voters and policymakers that research is for everyone, leading to better lives for ourselves, our friends and our loved ones. Reaching an ever-expanding audience via social media is critical. I hope you’ll join Act for NIH by sharing a selfie on social media with the hashtag #ACT4NIH.

Mary Woolley

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FDA Proposes Limit on Arsenic in Apple Juice

logo1The Food and Drug Administration announced Friday that it is proposing to establish a maximum level of arsenic acceptable in apple juice. The threshold, 10 parts per billion, is the same as the Environmental Protection Agency’s requirement for drinking water.

The agency will accept public comments on the proposed action for 60 days.

Nearly two years ago, reports from the TV show of Mehmet Oz, MD, and later Consumer Reports, raised alarms about the amount of arsenic appearing in apple juice. The FDA’s own subsequent investigation found that overall arsenic levels were generally below the 10 ppb threshold. Of those that were higher, the levels of inorganic arsenic — identified as a known carcinogen — were all below 10 ppb.

Organic arsenic, which is normally found in the earth’s crust, is essentially harmless, according to the agency. Continue reading →

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: A bad year to have a good idea?

Dear Research Advocate,

“2013 is a bad year to have a good idea,” was the bleak statement Laura Niedernhofer, MD, PhD, made about the impact of sequestration in a recent FASEB report. None of us want this year, or this country, to be a bad starting point for good ideas … but that’s what’s at stake. Think about telling someone with a serious illness that this isn’t a good year, or a good decade, for research. Think about telling them that from here on out, it may always be a bad year for a good idea.

Is there hope for turning this around? We have bipartisan support and we have champions; that we need more is a reality, but by no means an impossibility. Cancer research advocates gathered last evening to honor Congresswoman DeLauro (D-CT-03) and Senator Shelby (R-AL). Several other Members of Congress gave inspiring remarks, with an emphasis on adopting a positive, can-do approach, focusing on the local impact of research and stressing the profound and enduring consequences of backtracking. They counseled advocates, “Don’t take no for an answer!” In yesterday’s NIH appropriations hearing, Chairwoman Mikulski (D-MD) vowed to “work her earrings off” to make sure the agency gets the funding it needs. Strong bipartisan support for research was the byword for the session. Continue reading →

Rally for Medical Research: Building a grassroots movement to make medical research a higher national priority


Thousands of scientists, patients and research advocates gathered on the grounds of the Carnegie Library in Washington, DC, on April 8 to unite behind a call for increased funding for medical research. The Rally for Medical Research was organized by the American Association for Cancer Research in conjunction with their annual meeting and was supported by more than 200 partnering organizations — including Research!America. The program featured statements from patients and their families, scientists, policy makers, and research advocates. Cokie Roberts of ABC News and NPR, cancer survivor and research advocate, was the master of ceremonies. Continue reading →

One week away: the Rally for Medical Research

Rally For Medical ResearchNext Monday, April 8, is the Rally for Medical Research! Speakers at the rally will include Research!America Chair the Honorable John Edward Porter, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Ranking Member on the Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Ranking Member on the House Budget Committee as well as actress and breast cancer survivor Maura Tierney (best known for her roles on NewsRadio & ER) and many others!

If the medical research community advocates hard enough and loud enough, we may be able to turn the tide on cuts to research funding. As recently reported in the Washington Post, sequestration cuts can be countered if we urge policy makers to make research a higher national priority. Now, more than ever, we must make it clear to our legislators that federal research funding is critical to the health and well-being of Americans.

If you can’t make it to the rally, you can watch the event live on the web, contact your representatives in Congress and write a letter to the editor for your local paper to support medical research. Resources to help you write and call your Senators and Congressmen or to write a letter to the editor are available in the Rally’s toolkit.

A special thanks to Maura Tierney, Rep. Chris Van Hollen and Rep. Rosa DeLauro for their support of the Rally and medical research!