Tag Archives: scientific research

Few Americans Know Where Elected Officials and Candidates Stand on Government Support for Research and Innovation, New Polling Booklet Reveals

Research!America and partners launch national voter education initiative to elevate the priority of medical progress

ALEXANDRIA, Va.April 8, 2014—Two-thirds of Americans (66%) say it’s important for candidates running for office to assign a high priority to funding medical research, according to America Speaks, Volume 14, a compilation of key questions from public opinion polls commissioned by Research!America. Polling shows that Americans place a high value on U.S. leadership in medical innovation, yet only 12% say they are very well informed about the positions of their senators and representative when it comes to their support of medical and scientific research. www.researchamerica.org/poll_summary.

To help close this knowledge gap, Research!America and partner organizations are launching a national voter education initiative, Ask Your Candidates! Is Medical Research Progress a Priority? Through online and grassroots activities, social media strategies and on-the-ground events, congressional candidates will be urged to share their views on government policies and support for medical innovation conducted in both the public and private sectors. www.askyourcandidates.org.

“Candidates must do a better job articulating their vision for medical progress, clarifying what level of priority they assign to research as a way to assure improved health, well-being and economic security of all Americans,” said Mary Woolley, president and CEO of Research!America. “Voters need to know whether their candidates view lifesaving medical research as an imperative or an afterthought.”

During election season, Americans want candidates to talk about medical progress. Nearly three-quarters (74%) say it’s important to know whether their candidates for Congress are supportive of medical and scientific research. Notably, more than half of respondents (53%) do not believe elected officials in Washington are paying enough attention to combating the many deadly diseases that afflict Americans. Continue reading →

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Research!America Joins Coalition of Small Business Innovators

CSBI Encourages a Tax Code that Promotes Economic Growth and Creates Jobs

ALEXANDRIA, Va.- August 28, 2013– Research!America announced today it has joined the Coalition of Small Business Innovators (CSBI).  CSBI is a national, non-partisan coalition of organizations dedicated to stimulating sustained, private investment in small, highly innovative companies focusing on the development of new technologies.

Research!America is the nation’s largest nonprofit public education and advocacy alliance working to make research to improve health a higher national priority.

“Research!America is a particularly influential voice in efforts to promote medical innovation. Our missions are well-aligned, and we are truly pleased they have joined our effort,” said Coalition spokesperson Sarah Elliott.

“Our principles of advocating for strong policies that support furthering medical, health and scientific research are in line with CSBI’s goals, and we are excited to join the effort,” said, Mary Woolley, CEO of Research!America. “For research intensive companies to develop cutting-edge products, the tax code needs to be adjusted to better incentivize private investment.  The tax reforms proposed by the Coalition make sense for business and job creation, for patients, and for our nation’s global competitiveness.” Continue reading →

Sequestration Forces Scientist To Euthanize His Genetically Modified Rabbits

Excerpt of an article published in The Huffington Post with first-hand accounts of how sequestration is impacting scientific research.

When The Huffington Post published an in-depth look at how budget cuts were affecting scientific research, we encouraged readers to offer reactions and share personal experiences.

Responses varied. There were some in the political world, primarily conservatives, who believed the issue was overblown. Funding for the National Institutes of Health, they noted, remained robust at $29 billion. And while the agency’s budget has decreased because of sequestration, it is still dramatically higher than it was under Bill Clinton, even when adjusted for inflation.

Reactions from academics and advocates were decidedly different. If anything, they thought the piece undersold the problem. Michael Lubell, Director of Public Affairs at the America Physical Society, one of the world’s largest organizations of physicists, noted that the NIH budget “stagnated and in purchasing power declined significantly” in the past few years. And it isn’t just the NIH feeling the pinch, he added. The Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, and other government agencies are all slashing support for grants.

The most illustrative feedback, however, came from scientists, researchers and students from throughout the country who offered their own personal experiences with funding cuts, ranging from being forced to move their families to other countries to find work, to euthanizing the bunnies on which they’d been conducting experiments. Continue reading →