Tag Archives: tax

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Brink and Blink, and repeat…

Dear Research Advocate:

After 16 costly, wasteful days, the government has been funded through January 15 at post-sequestration, FY13 levels — hardly adequate for providing the solutions the American public awaits. A bicameral, bipartisan budget committee has been charged to develop a long-term deficit reduction plan by December 13. If these marching orders sound familiar, they should: We’ve been down this road before, only this time sequestration isn’t the threat at the end, it’s embedded in the negotiations. As tempting as it is to give in to brinksmanship fatigue and just tune out the process, advocates must seize the opportunity to make sure our issue remains front and center, that it becomes impossible for lawmakers to ignore. Sequestration must go; research and innovation must be an immutable national priority, supported at the level of scientific opportunity that will allow us to overcome health challenges and continue to drive the economy.

We are pursuing every opportunity to make the case on behalf of our alliance. Yesterday, I was privileged to join an impressive group of speakers, including Leon Panetta, at a “stop the madness and do your job” press conference sponsored by the Campaign to Fix the Debt. Among the strong points emphasized by former Secretary Panetta, who also served as White House chief of staff, congressman and OMB director, was a call for long-term — he suggested five years — thinking and budgeting for non-defense discretionary spending. Continue reading →

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A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: America can do better

Dear Research Advocate:

The 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the clarion call for equality for all Americans brings to mind the work still to be done to address health disparities. For example, cancer incidence and death rates are significantly higher for African-Americans than for all other ethnic groups, and Hispanic and African-American adults are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to have diabetes than white adults. Our polling shows that nearly 75% of Americans believe it is imperative to conduct research to understand and combat health disparities. As a community of advocates, we need to press policy makers to keep this unacceptable gap in health care and health outcomes in their sights. America can do better.

As September nears, Congress returns to Washington with a looming fiscal debate. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew reports that the debt ceiling will need to be raised earlier than anticipated, possibly as soon as mid-October. The urgency of this deadline takes away any buffer time on which congressional leadership may have hoped to rely. A funding measure for FY14, sequestration, the debt limit, reforms and a government shutdown may well be contenders in the upcoming debate. It will certainly keep advocates for medical and health research busy — fighting sequestration, pushing for greater research funding, pressing for the exemption of user fees from sequestration (should the across-the-board spending cuts remain in place), and even weighing in on the impact of tax and entitlement reform on medical innovation, although it is unlikely that such a reform effort would happen now. Continue reading →

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: A thorn-laden rose

Dear Research Advocate,

The President’s budget is out and it’s a mixed bag. First, the good news. NSF was given a significant funding boost, $593M over 2012 levels, NIH funding was increased by $470M, and AHRQ, via budget trade-offs, looks to have been boosted by $64M. The increases are from FY12 to FY14, since the President’s budget replaces sequestration in a different way than either Congressional body (see more below). The not so good news in the President’s budget is that other health research agencies did not fare well. The CDC budget was cut deeply, especially prevention programs. FDA was essentially flat -funded. And entitlement-reform may pose a challenge to innovation.

The different ways the three budgets, President, Senate and House, deal with sequestration is symptomatic of the continuing failure to reach agreement on anything resembling comprehensive legislation, including so-called “grand bargains.” The fact that there is so much attention to medical research in the President’s budget, as well as on the floor of the Senate recently, and from a number of Members of Congress, speaks to the progress the research advocacy community is making in bringing medical research to the forefront. But success to date has not diminished the need for heightened advocacy for public health and social sciences research, nor the imperative of carefully evaluating the full consequences of changes to entitlements. The three budgets deal with entitlements in different ways, but with similar ill-effect when it comes to innovation. There is no question that we need tax and entitlement reform, and no question that sequestration must be eliminated; however, we cannot thrive as a nation or succeed at deficit reduction if entitlement reforms come at the expense of private sector innovation.  See our statement on the President’s budget here.

Speaking of social science research — so clearly under fire —  it is not too late to RSVP to a Capitol Hill briefing we are co-hosting tomorrow on economic research. There is a terrific lineup of speakers.

I know many of you attended the Rally for Medical Research on Monday here in Washington,  a coalition effort led by the AACR. Thousands of like-minded research advocates and a wonderful array of speakers, including our board chair, The Honorable John Porter, gathered to crank up the volume for research. In his remarks, Mr. Porter urged advocates to get fighting mad or we risk continued cuts from Congress. Review his remarks here; then, take a moment to participate in the Rally’s on-going text messaging campaign to urge Congress to assign a high priority to medical research. You can view press coverage of the event and the full list of speakers. During the event, social media attention was strong — messaging trended #2 globally on Twitter.  That’s the level of volume and attention we must continue to maintain if we want to see a happy ending to budget negotiations.  Please do your part!

More than 50 Nobel laureates are doing their part; they have joined forces to send a letter to Congress urging them to fund, rather than freeze or cut, research and development. In the letter, the Laureates cite their deep concern over reduced funding levels and the negative impact this will have on the next generation of scientists and ultimately, upon our nation’s economic vitality. It’s a good reminder that the full science community is in this battle together.  Take a moment now to echo their message by urging your representative to sign on the Markey-McKinley letter calling for a $1.5B boost to NIH funding. Click here to see the list of current signers. If your representative is on the list, be sure to thank them for standing up for research. If they haven’t signed-on yet, click here to send them a message.

On Monday, we released our latest national poll, focused on chronic pain and drug addiction. Surprisingly, only 18% of the poll respondents believe chronic pain is a major health problem, yet two-thirds know someone who has sought relief from chronic pain. Huge majorities are concerned about  abuse or misuse of prescription medications; the need for better understanding of how to address chronic pain literally cries out for research. You can view our media release here.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley

A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Down to the wire

Dear Research Advocate,

Progress toward a deal to avert the fiscal cliff seems now to have been reversed, with talk today of reintroducing aspects of the Ryan budget — more severe than sequestration. Holidays or not, this is no time to let up on our individual and collective advocacy for research. Reps. Fudge (D-OH) and Stivers (R-OH) are leading a bipartisan sign-on letter, urging Congress to take into account the critical importance of NIH in any deficit reduction plan. Take action and urge your representatives to sign on! For those of you in Ohio, if you would like to thank Reps. Fudge and Stivers for their efforts, you may obtain their contact information here.

In addition to ensuring sufficient federal funding for research, the government must provide a tax and regulatory environment that is pro-research and pro-innovation. Last week, Research!America sent letters to congressional leaders and the president sharing information about significant contraction in the medical device industry that appears to be associated with the looming medical device tax. If our nation’s leaders truly believe that innovation is the path to lasting economic prosperity for our nation, then they must evaluate both funding and policy, including tax policy changes, in that context. Excerpts of the letters were quoted in CQ Healthbeat and POLITICO Pro articles.

Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-HI) died this week; reportedly, his last word was “aloha.” Sen. Inouye’s incomparable leadership and half-century of service to our nation will be sorely missed. As chairman of the Appropriations Committee, he played a vital role in boosting funding for research. He was an ardent advocate of nursing and nursing research, as well as research focused on helping those in military service and our returning veterans.

We look forward to working with Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), who will succeed Sen. Inouye as chairman of appropriations. Sen. Mikulski received the Whitehead Award from Research!America last March. She was honored for her long-standing leadership and support for medical research, public health and prevention, regulatory science, and the physical sciences, as well as her support for research as a force for economic competitiveness. She is a champion of women’s health issues and has authored comprehensive legislation to accelerate research on Alzheimer’s disease.

As our nation continues to mourn the tragic shooting in Newtown, CT, I am reminded that research has a role to play in keeping Americans safe through better understanding of how to assure public safety concerning guns, keeping in mind both government and individual responsibilities, and in better understanding mental health challenges. Our public policies should be evidence-based, and when we don’t have the evidence, we need the research to establish it. Research!America extends our deepest sympathies to the families affected by this incident.

It is indeed a time of reflection as to what should be the role of the government in assisting us as individuals — and as a society — in accomplishing our goals and living our values. Our nation and our elected representatives have a challenging time ahead, as does every advocate for research and every patient and caregiver. Let’s not let the year end without stepping up to the challenge, engaging our policy makers and putting research front and center.

All of us at Research!America wish you and yours a joyous holiday season.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley

Majority of Americans Doubt Congress and White House Can Resolve Budget Problems and Avoid Fiscal Cliff

Poll Reveals Deep Concerns Among Americans about Impact of Spending Cuts to Medical Research

Alexandria, Va.—December 13, 2012—Nearly 60% of Americans are skeptical that Congress and the White House will reach an agreement that will avoid the fiscal cliff, according to a new national public opinion poll commissioned by Research!America.  More than 80% of Republicans, nearly 40% of Democrats and 65% of Independents say they are “not too confident” or “not at all confident” current negotiations will result in a deal.  The findings reveal growing doubt among many Americans that Congress and the Administration will be able to make a deal that would avoid tax increases for most Americans and major funding cuts for federal agencies, including those that are responsible for funding medical research.

“Congress and the Administration must make bold decisions to address our nation’s deficit, but cutting funding for research should not be one of them,” said Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley. “We cannot afford to drain the research pipeline as other countries challenge our world leadership in science and innovation.”

An overwhelming majority of Americans (83%) say that medical research is important to reducing health care costs. And an even larger percentage (87%)  believe that it is important that our nation support research that focuses on improving how our health care system is functioning.

Even in a challenging fiscal environment, Americans continue to place a high priority on biomedical and health research. Upon learning that the percentage of government spending allocated for biomedical and health research is roughly 1.5%, almost half of Americans (48%) believed that it was not enough. In fact, 54% would be willing to pay $1 per week more in taxes if they were certain that all of the money would be spent for additional medical research. This comes as no surprise, as more than half (55%) of Americans do not believe that the U.S. is making enough progress in medical research.

“Our polling underscores support for a stronger investment in research — there’s no doubt that people want a cure, sooner rather than later, for Alzheimer’s, diabetes, cancer and so many other diseases and disabilities,” added Woolley. “In a time when difficult decisions have to be made, Americans overwhelmingly believe research and innovation should be prioritized.”

Other poll highlights include:

  • More than three-quarters of Americans (78%) say that it is important that the U.S. work to improve health globally through research and innovation.
  • Nearly 70% of Americans believe that the federal government should increase support for programs and policies that would increase the number of young Americans who pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
  • 66% of Americans, say they would be willing to share personal health information to advance medical research assuming that appropriate privacy protections were used.
  • 68% of Americans say it’s important that the federal research and development tax credit is made permanent.

The National Public Opinion Poll was conducted online in December 2012 by JZ Analytics for Research!America. The poll had a sample size of 1,000, with a theoretical sampling error of +/- 3.2%. To view the poll, visit: http://www.researchamerica.org/uploads/December2012pollslides.pdf

About the National Public Opinion Poll

Research!America began commissioning polls in 1992 in an effort to understand public support for medical, health and scientific research. The results of Research!America’s polls have proven invaluable to our alliance of member organizations and, in turn, to the fulfillment of our mission to make research to improve health a higher national priority. In response to growing usage and demand, Research!America has expanded its portfolio, which includes state, national and issue-specific polling. Poll data is available by request or at www.researchamerica.org.

About Research!America

Research!America  is the nation’s largest nonprofit public education and advocacy alliance working to make research to improve health a higher national priority. Founded in 1989, Research!America is supported by member organizations representing 125 million Americans. Visit www.researchamerica.org.